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of the impossible." join us with your phone calls booktv.ts on c-span2's >> new gingrich was first elected in 1978 and served as speaker of the house from 1995 until 1999. since leaving congress, he has written more than 20 books and is an analyst on the fox news channel. our conversation includes his early years in politics, his tenure and his views on the obama administration, his conversion to catholicism and his possible reentry into the gop presidential race. this is about 40 minutes. >> we have -- >> what is the state of ourwe learn -- we have to learn how to compete with china, how to deal with radical islam, and how to deal with our deficit. those are going to be difficult challenges. >> you have used the word radical in description of this president. why do you use that word? >> 55% of the american people believe he is a socialist. his policies represent such a huge increase in power in washington. a health care bill the country overwhelmingly wants to appeal, a massive intrusion of government into your life in a way that is just amazing. a financial reform bill that radically centralizes
think what happened is the plan to use health care as a campaign issue is the economy overshadowed everything. people are first and foremost concerned about having a job. you need to have a job first. that is where people's minds seem to be. host: what else did you hear from the secretary? guest: she talked about the health insurance companies and working with them. there seems to be concern on wall street about what exactly will happen when all the provisions are put in place, how well the company's react? what is their bottom line? for consumers, they should care about that. about that. if they do consolidate, that is an issue for people. guest: she did not give an indication that she thought there would be -- there should be a federal rate review. be a federal rate review. now, even though we are seeing some of these premium increases, she made it clear that she thinks states will have the tools they need in order to keep insurance premiums from going up unfairly. she thinks states will be able to keep those premiums from taking effect. host: she is a former governor of kansas a
. >> or their agencies or departments on the federal level that you would reduce or eliminate? >> in minnesota, we use priority age budget -- priority based budget, and i am proud of my record of cutting spending. minnesota had an average two- year increase of spending of 21% over 40 years. absolutely unsustainable and irresponsible. we cut that down to about 1.7% average spending growth during my time as governor. for the first time in history of my state, we have cut spending in real terms. one of the techniques we have used is priority based budgeting. we make a list of the things that government can and should do, but the most and -- put the most important things on top. in our case it was a military and veterans' families. higher education got cut, social services got cut, some state subsidized health care programs got cut, and much more. you have to be willing to set priorities and make tough decisions. i have a record of doing that in minnesota. >> when republicans had the white house and congress, george w. bush wasanded a budget surplus. do you find fault with both parties? >> is fair to say
their bets in ways that ar not helpful to the u.s. with respect to afghanistan. >> if the military thinks this is a good thing, then what would you say? >> you want to pay heed and gives some deference to the numbers -- members of the military and the leadership, for sure. there is no question about that. i know that president obama and others are starting to back off on that date as a hard deadline for beginning to dramatically reduce troops. they are talking about perhaps it will be a small reduction and they will see what goes on from there in terms of conditions on the ground. even they have backed off that day as a hard day. th is some progress, in my mind. what can we win afghanistan could mark >> we definitely can win in afghanistan. there is a long way to go in iraq, but with the right tactics, leadership, and tragic, we see a good future for iraq. that se hope can be in afghanistan if we follow the direction complete the mission. general petraeus said he thinks he can stall the insurgency's progress or stop it relatively quickly, and then began to turn it back our way. will take
.m. eastern. at c-span.org, you can find an archive of past "prime minister's questions." >> monday, the u.s. senate impeachment trial begins its hearings for the prosecution of a u.s. district court judge who is trying -- charged with accepting gifts from those who had cases before him. it is expected to last throughout the week. this starts at 80 a eastern on c-span2. >> monday, a discussion about ending world hunger, an economist and ordained minister, who was named a warrant -- world food prize laureate. watch the coverage on c-span. >> the c-span networks. we provide coverage of nonfiction books, public affairs, in history. it is all available on television, radio, online and social networking sites, and find our content any time on the c-span video library, and we take c-span on the road with our mobile content vehicle, bringing our resources to you. the c-span networks, now available in 100 million homes, created by cable, provided as a public service. >> now, the first colorado senate debate between michael bennett and republican challenger. they answered questions on the federal hea
of the day it is going to be worse than the r&d tax credit. >> thank you for being with us. book is usedky's as a blueprint for bringing about change. >> nicholas von hoffman spent 10 years working for him and writes about his experiences in "radical, a portrait of salt alinsky."l there was an hour-long debate tuesday. political analyst john keller the question of the candidates about the state's budget, health care system, and schools. this is 55 minutes. >> good evening and welcome to the first televised debate between the four candidates for governor of massachusetts. let's meet the candidates and get our debate started. they are republican nominee charlie baker, former ceo of harvard pilgrim health care. the democratic nominee is the incumbent. then kent k. hill and green party jill stein. thank you for being here. there are no opening or closing statements tonight. we have just questions from me and from voters. each candidate gets up to one minute to respond to each question and then we will open it up for free and open debate. let's begin. mr. baker, your name comes first in the alp
for the evening are here with us. let's get to it. josh, first question. mr. binnie, first response. >> we're here to talk about the issues. the tone of this race has become an issue. a lot of people say it has been one of the nastiest primary races in recent memory in new hampshire. where do you draw the line between an honest critique -- of their critique of your opponents background and nasty campaigning? >> it is a pleasure to be here tonight. it has been my pleasure to run for the united states senate. the people of new hampshire have gotten to know me. my dad introduced me over nine months ago. folks understand that i care about the job and the economy. when i became the frontrunner in the august, we were attacked by all kinds of private organizations. i thought that was not fair. i did not like it. not for amnesty. i am a liberal. ask my kids. what i am about is talking and dealing with the economic crisis that new hampshire is experiencing. we need jobs in our state. that is what i want to talk about. they do not care about these ads. they want to hear our policies and our background and h
to the u.s. house of representatives in 1978. he served as speaker of the house from 1995 to 1999. since leaving congress, he has written more than 20 books and it is an analyst on the fox news channel. our conversation with newt gingrich includes his early years in congress, his tenure as speaker, his relationship with president clinton, his views on the obama administration and the midterm election, his conversion to catholicism, and the gop presidential race. this is about 40 minutes. >> we have to figure out how to dramatically shrink the cost and size of government. those will be very big challenges for us as a country. >> you used the word "ratko" in describing this president -- "radical" in describing as president. why? >> is far more the most radical president. his administration represents a huge growth in government, a massive increase in the government control of your life, acquiring every transaction of $600 or more in a way that is an amazing intrusion in our lives. a financial reform bill that radically centralizes power in washington, d.c. a dramatic increase in the presid
and europeans coming here, we stand up for what we believe in. nothing did more to destroy us as politicians is that we only said what was favorable to a particular audience. >> what did you hear? >> i am impressed by everyone here. i would like to say that i'm not remotely racist and i'm not entirely in less, less british then you are. we have to become united is a country and we're not at the moment. we have to be fair to all immigrants, but we have to expect them to accept our culture. to lets move on candidates question. >> dan referred to earlier. in the last week, have challenged the media consensus that there is no alternative except to cut spending now and that we should spend more on housing and jobs to support the economic recovery. what other areas to the canada is think we need to challenge the media consensus in order to run the argument for the margin the biggest political problem is looking into an aisle at the financial system relation. we have to set forward a credible alternative. we need to pay back the deficit. more should come from taxes, because times like this, if you
tomorrow to talk about the u.s. economy at the latest afl-cio labor day event. follow the people and events that make history online at the c-span video library. the transfer of a canal, the impeachment of a president, the events of 9/11, watched what happened as it happened, all free any time. it is washington your way. now there is a discussion on the midterm elections. speakers include jonah goldberg. it is part of a conference by the american political science association. this portion is just under an hour and a half. [applause] >> thank you, gene. is a pleasure to be here. people are looking for big republican gains in the midterm elections. low approvals of congress, presidential ratings, a bad ratio of what is called the " right track/wrong track" poor economic conditions and poor perceptions of the economy by voters, an advantage by republicans issue-by-issue on each of the issues that are pulled at the moment, which is a dramatic change from two years ago and four years ago, and sea- by-seat, there is a lot more honorable democrats then bolar republicans. it would seem to be likel
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)

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